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Undefeated x Nike Kobe 1 Protro ‘Friends and Family’ Giveaway

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Undefeated x Nike Kobe 1 Protro ‘Friends and Family’ Giveaway

Over NBA All-Star Weekend, Undefeated did its thing on the Kobe 1 Protro, paying homage to the Black Mamba’s legacy in L.A. by releasing two special make ups of the upgraded retro sneaker. In addition to the styles that hit shelves, Undefeated also cooked up unreleased versions including a patent leather purple variation and a friends and family olive green. Months later, the latter pair will be made available to Undefeated customers, but there’s a (huge) catch.

In celebration of the opening of Undefeated Harajuku’s new Meiji Dori location, the retailer is making 10 pairs of the olive Kobe 1 Protros available to customers this weekend. Shoppers who make a purchase during opening day will be entered into a raffle—but that’s only the beginning.

Undefeated x Nike Kobe 1 Protro 'Friends and Family' (Front)
Image via Undefeated

Raffle winners will then be seeded in a basketball competition for a chance to take home one of the 10 friends and family pairs. Specifics of the tournament have not been disclosed, although Undefeated is pointing interested parties to its @undefeated_harajuka Instagram for further details. 

Undefeated Harajuku’s Meiji Dori location opens Friday, July 14.

Undefeated x Nike Kobe 1 Protro 'Friends and Family' (Heel)
Image via Undefeated
Undefeated x Nike Kobe 1 Protro 'Friends and Family' (With Accessories)
Image via Undefeated
Undefeated x Nike Kobe 1 Protro 'Friends and Family' (Pair Lateral)
Image via Undefeated
Undefeated x Nike Kobe 1 Protro 'Friends and Family' (Front Pair)
Image via Undefeated
Undefeated x Nike Kobe 1 Protro 'Friends and Family' (Heel and Lateral)
Image via Undefeated

 

Article written by Riley Jones #Complex

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Fashion

Kanye West Is Still a Merch Heavyweight

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Kanye West Is Still a Merch Heavyweight

Kanye West with Kids See Ghosts Merch

The rapper-designer might have figured out out a new way to move his Yeezy apparel.

When Kanye released his Life of Pablo merch in 2016, fans snaked around blocks in cities across the world hoping to get their hands on $55 tees and $108 hoodies. But after waiting hours for the goods, not all the fans who got their hands on the merch were happy with what they felt. The Life of Pablo designs were printed on blank Gildan T-shirts, which only cost a couple bucks each. “The sourcing has nothing to do with the aesthetics or the value of the line,” a source close to Kanye told Page Six in response to the backlash. “To talk about the source of the shirt misses the point entirely. It’s like writing an article on how an artist sells a $50 canvas for $1 million. Pointless.” Printing on blanks is a common technique for merch companies and startup streetwear lines, but Kanye doing it rankled. Two years later, though, Kanye is starting to use some significantly more expensive canvases.

Over the weekend, at Tyler, the Creator’s music festival Camp Flog Gnaw, Kanye and Kid Cudi performed for the first time as their group Kids See Ghosts. And it wouldn’t have been a Kanye event without new merch to commemorate the occasion. So the merch booth displayed short- and long-sleeve tees along with hoodies printed with meandering text designed by Cactus Plant Flea Market. Graphic apparel from Kanye West isn’t necessarily novel, but these items had one crucial difference: instead of Gildan tees, these were printed on Yeezy blanks—the gray and brown and green shirts he sells under the Yeezy name, just with fresh new graphics. And despite some of the recent spoutings of misogynistic alt-right messages, fans weren’t deterred. Footage from Camp Flog Gnaw showed long winding lines of people waiting to buy the merch.

The new apparel makes sense given the recent trajectory of Kanye’s apparel endeavors. The undeniably successful piece of Kanye’s apparel business has always been the merch, printed with graphics made by or in collaboration with Kanye. But that’s distinct from the goal Kanye’s always shouted about on concert stages: growing his own Yeezy apparel business without the help of Confederate flag graphics, or chunky sleeve prints. Printing merch on his own Yeezy blanks is a natural marriage of those two elements. Finally, the thinking goes, Kanye can sell his Yeezy clothing at the same pace as his merch.

Kanye’s consistently found inventive ways to pair what customers desperately want from him—sneakers, merch—with what he desperately wants to sell them. Late last year, the rapper-designer released his super-hyped Yeezy 500s, but with a crucial catch. For customers to get their hands on them, they had to buy a $760 bundle that included $500 worth of sweats. This new merch strategy isn’t entirely different. In order to buy the latest merch, customers have to buy the full-price Yeezy gear it’s printed on.

It’s possible that Kanye just had blanks lying around and decided he needed to make use of them in some way. Confusingly, the cheapest Kids See Ghosts tees cost $70 while the most affordable Yeezy shirt currently available is a $120 “Classic T-Shirt” from Yeezy Season 6. The price discrepancy makes me wonder if these were tees from previous seasons.

Or maybe Kanye is executing a larger-scale pivot to the merch business. Turning Yeezy into an upscale Gildan—providing blanks for other musicians in his circle—sounds like a profitable business. There’s an appetite for it, certainly: thanks in large part to Kanye himself, we know that fans will pay more for new and fancier merch than ever before. Mostly, though, it would serve as a way to get Yeezy tees into a lot more closets, even if not in the form Kanye initially dreamed.

Kanye’s Yeezy line has mutated many times over the course of its six seasons. One season, Kanye rented out Madison Square Garden to premiere the new collection. After that, he brought members of the fashion industry onto an island in New York City where models passed out from the heat. For his most recent collection, he ended up ditching the show format altogether and released a lookbook featuring famous women in the clothes. Now, Yeezy is trying on yet another new identity, turning the line’s tees and hoodies into expensive canvases.

Watch:

GQ Editors on Their Menswear Addictions

Article written by Cam Wolf #GQ

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Introducing the Workwear Suit | GQ

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Introducing the Workwear Suit | GQ

Acne Studios workwearsuits

The suit isn’t dead—it’s just made out of canvas now.

This year, workwear did something weird: It became fashion. Heritage brands started to be as sought after as the most hyped streetwear drops. Stylish guys today mix Comme des Garçons and Carhartt with newfound aplomb, and red-hot labels like Alyx and Vetements are collaborating with heritage brands like Dickies and Champion. If menswear is trending toward durable and dressed-down right now, the tailored suit remains a necessity among the formal office 9-to-5 set. (Not every guy can sport chore coats and work pants at the office.) Now, though, the twin poles of modern workwear seem to have collided: Guys across the globe are giving the suit a duck-canvas-and-rivets remix, and wearing matching work-inspired threads as quasi-suits. The world of menswear has turned well and truly upside down—and it looks pretty damn good.

French label Le Mont St Michel is famous for its iconic three-pocket work jacket, which it’s been manufacturing since 1913. The piece is unlined and unadorned—but when worn with a pair of matching pants, the garment gives off the aura of something much more elegant. (Just avoid doing this in a shade of Kelly green, unless you want to wear the official uniform of sanitation workers in Paris.) With the right amount of confidence, you could probably wear the combination to a formal event without anyone being the wiser. Nervier brands are following the example. The latest collection from Americana-inspired Japanese label Engineered Garments, meanwhile, features a mandarin-collared twill overshirt and matching pants, both in a shade of deep olive green. Acne Studios offers dark navy chino trousers and a similarly shaded utility jacket. Other more wallet-friendly labels like COS and Need Supply’s in-house brand offer a variety of chore coats and trousers that can be seamlessly paired together as a matching set.

In addition to longstanding labels and beloved menswear brands putting out workwear staples, a younger generation is also making its mark on the style. Bonne, the Amsterdam-based label started by stylist-turned-designer Bonne Reijn, makes not-so-precious suits designed for everyday wear. The work-inspired garments, which are carried by downtown-cool retailers like Opening Ceremony, are unisex and made of a heavy cotton fabric that’s sturdy but soft and are sold as a set. “I really wanted to make clothing that serves as many different styles and backgrounds as possible,” Reijn says. “My challenge was really to make something that would fit as many people as possible.” The designer mentions his desire to make clothes is much more “social commentary than fashion” in his eyes. “My utopia would be that everybody would wear the same thing and we would judge people based on personality and not the fact that they were certain brands,” he explains. And it’s an interesting notion: A singular suit that can be worn by mechanics and accountants alike. It might feel more dystopian, if not for the fact that you can wear yours with a tie, or just a T-shirt.

The editors, fashion insiders, and cool kids at Spring-Summer 2019’s biggest menswear shows in Milan, Paris, and New York gravitated toward work jackets and durable pants, often pairing the two together as if they were a matching two-piece suit. The fit of both garments usually skews more relaxed and less clean-cut than typical tailoring, but the end result is still sharp and deliberate. Bergdorf Goodman’s men’s fashion director and street-style favorite Bruce Pask was photographed at Paris Fashion Week wearing a deep navy work jacket, ultra-wide trousers, and white sneakers. Josh Peskowitz, co-founder of Magasin in Los Angeles and a well-known menswear figure, can usually be caught dressing up a typical chore jacket of the major fashion shows. Even a quick perusal of GQ’s own street-style coverage reveals matching workwear-style jackets and pants worn in a similar manner, with broad colors ranging from soft lavender to pinstripe blue.

The chore coat has been around for over a century, worn by iconic style figures like the late, great fashion photographer Bill Cunningham as well as today’s current menswear class. It’s long had a quiet presence in how men dress—perfect for any guy who wants a jacket that’s as utilitarian as it is fashionable—but has surged in popularity alongside the booming workwear trend. The rise of idiosyncratic trousers and the slow death of the skinny jean have both paved the way for pants that are full of delightful fits, crops, and hems. Combine the two and you can fabricate your own workwear-inspired suit of sorts for a look that feels closer to rugged American style than fine Italian tailoring. During a time when a Carhartt chore coat is deemed just as en vogue as a Brioni blazer, the workwear suit feels just as subversive as it is sharp. It may never be shown on the runway but is instead found on the everyday streets, worn by men from all walks of life. Not to mention that it’s one hell of a way to look dapper without actually dressing up.

Article written by Tyler Watamanuk #GQ

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Rami Malek Makes an Excellent Case for Out-of-Office Work Pants

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Rami Malek Makes an Excellent Case for Out-of-Office Work Pants

Rami Malek on red carpet

Getty Images

Check, please.

Rami Malek has been wearing a lot of really wonderful, brave stuff during the Bohemian Rhapsody press tour. Electric blue and gingham suiting that lands right at the top of our weekly Best-Dressed list, and the kind of colorful sweaters we will never stop trying (and, we suspect, failing) to persuade you to add to your wardrobe. But this move? This one sells itself. If you can look at this photo and honestly tell us you don’t want to look like Rami Malek tonight when you go out to do whatever it is you’re doing, then fine, you’re dismissed. FOR THE OTHER 87 PERCENT OF YOU, let’s talk about what’s happening here.

What’s happening here is Rami Malek wearing work pants and not looking at all like a guy at work. What’s happening here is Rami Malek taking a very conservative item of clothing and making it look like something that could hang in a dive bar or at least a crappy restaurant. What’s happening here is Rami Malek not being the 87 millionth guy to wake up and put on jeans or chinos.

The recipe goes like this: Buy or reach for some nice, respectable trousers that fit well. Slim, no break at the hem, that kind of vibe. Bonus points if they’re check or a deep, dark color. Now wear those trousers with all black. A black bomber jacket, crewneck sweater, and chunky derby shoes if you want to be literal about it. Or try a black Henley, pocket tee, or hoodie as those would probably work, too. Only have black boots? Yeah, try that. Climate too cold for a bomber? A black topcoat or trench coat or even a puffer would fly. The only thing that matters is that you’re taking a truly good pair of work pants and corrupting the hell out of them with Saturday-night clothes, with black.

It’s a good move. But we didn’t have to tell you that.

Uniqlo merino crewneck sweater

$40, Uniqlo

Buy Now

Joseph Edgar tailored trousers

$495, Matches Fashion

Buy Now

Everlane cotton bomber jacket

$88, Everlane

Buy Now

Dr Martens black 1461 derbys

$120, Ssense

Buy Now

Garrett Leight Brooks sunglasses

$395, Garrett Leight

Buy Now

Article written by Megan Gustashaw #GQ

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