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Adidas Skateboarding Debut New Silhouette; 3MC

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Adidas Skateboarding Debut New Silhouette; 3MC

The vintage design cues on Adidas’ new 3MC skate sneaker may seem simple at a glance, but don’t let its no-frills looks fool you—the brand’s latest skate model is packed with performance tech.

adidas-3mc-black
Image via Adidas

Sole Collector sat down with Adidas skateboarding senior design director Chris Law to learn more about the making of the 3MC.

“With the 3MC, we knew that we were trying to design a simple shoe, one that feels like it came directly from the brand’s archive from a particular era,” said Law. “The silhouette features hits from the Gazelle in the vulc tape texture and includes an eyestay branding tab that is similar to the Steeley silhouette.” 

3MC_Triple Black
Image via Adidas

The sneaker features familiar Adidas cues, but take a look under the hood and you’ll find skate technology designed for a stronger, more stable ride with added comfort and a design specifically made for board control and durability. The sneaker includes a Geoflex outsole and triple-stitched logo for added support and overall durability.

The upper sits low in the vulc for good board feel and the hex outsole, which was, again, inspired by the original Gazelle, has added flex. The medial side also features three vent holes for better air circulation,” said Law

3MC_Triple Black
Image via Adidas

Despite these all these technical enhancements, the 3MC doesn’t leave the factory until it gets wear tested by the Adidas team riders. With their input and stamp of approval, the final result is what rolls out and hits shelves.

“We constantly workshop with our riders and seek input. As of lately, we are taking this further and really bringing in certain riders on board during the process and letting them see all the nuts and bolts of the build,” Law said. “Each rider is different and wants different things, so if it’s a Pro model, we definitely want a 100 percent open conversation and collaboration, but we also seek input into a non-rider specific product, as well.”

3MC_Outsole
Image via Adidas

The Adidas 3MC dropped July 5 for a retail price of $65. The sneaker is available for purchase on the Adidas skateboarding website and at select Adidas skateboarding retailers. 

Article written by Michael Conway #Complex

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Fashion

Introducing the Workwear Suit | GQ

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Introducing the Workwear Suit | GQ

Acne Studios workwearsuits

The suit isn’t dead—it’s just made out of canvas now.

This year, workwear did something weird: It became fashion. Heritage brands started to be as sought after as the most hyped streetwear drops. Stylish guys today mix Comme des Garçons and Carhartt with newfound aplomb, and red-hot labels like Alyx and Vetements are collaborating with heritage brands like Dickies and Champion. If menswear is trending toward durable and dressed-down right now, the tailored suit remains a necessity among the formal office 9-to-5 set. (Not every guy can sport chore coats and work pants at the office.) Now, though, the twin poles of modern workwear seem to have collided: Guys across the globe are giving the suit a duck-canvas-and-rivets remix, and wearing matching work-inspired threads as quasi-suits. The world of menswear has turned well and truly upside down—and it looks pretty damn good.

French label Le Mont St Michel is famous for its iconic three-pocket work jacket, which it’s been manufacturing since 1913. The piece is unlined and unadorned—but when worn with a pair of matching pants, the garment gives off the aura of something much more elegant. (Just avoid doing this in a shade of Kelly green, unless you want to wear the official uniform of sanitation workers in Paris.) With the right amount of confidence, you could probably wear the combination to a formal event without anyone being the wiser. Nervier brands are following the example. The latest collection from Americana-inspired Japanese label Engineered Garments, meanwhile, features a mandarin-collared twill overshirt and matching pants, both in a shade of deep olive green. Acne Studios offers dark navy chino trousers and a similarly shaded utility jacket. Other more wallet-friendly labels like COS and Need Supply’s in-house brand offer a variety of chore coats and trousers that can be seamlessly paired together as a matching set.

In addition to longstanding labels and beloved menswear brands putting out workwear staples, a younger generation is also making its mark on the style. Bonne, the Amsterdam-based label started by stylist-turned-designer Bonne Reijn, makes not-so-precious suits designed for everyday wear. The work-inspired garments, which are carried by downtown-cool retailers like Opening Ceremony, are unisex and made of a heavy cotton fabric that’s sturdy but soft and are sold as a set. “I really wanted to make clothing that serves as many different styles and backgrounds as possible,” Reijn says. “My challenge was really to make something that would fit as many people as possible.” The designer mentions his desire to make clothes is much more “social commentary than fashion” in his eyes. “My utopia would be that everybody would wear the same thing and we would judge people based on personality and not the fact that they were certain brands,” he explains. And it’s an interesting notion: A singular suit that can be worn by mechanics and accountants alike. It might feel more dystopian, if not for the fact that you can wear yours with a tie, or just a T-shirt.

The editors, fashion insiders, and cool kids at Spring-Summer 2019’s biggest menswear shows in Milan, Paris, and New York gravitated toward work jackets and durable pants, often pairing the two together as if they were a matching two-piece suit. The fit of both garments usually skews more relaxed and less clean-cut than typical tailoring, but the end result is still sharp and deliberate. Bergdorf Goodman’s men’s fashion director and street-style favorite Bruce Pask was photographed at Paris Fashion Week wearing a deep navy work jacket, ultra-wide trousers, and white sneakers. Josh Peskowitz, co-founder of Magasin in Los Angeles and a well-known menswear figure, can usually be caught dressing up a typical chore jacket of the major fashion shows. Even a quick perusal of GQ’s own street-style coverage reveals matching workwear-style jackets and pants worn in a similar manner, with broad colors ranging from soft lavender to pinstripe blue.

The chore coat has been around for over a century, worn by iconic style figures like the late, great fashion photographer Bill Cunningham as well as today’s current menswear class. It’s long had a quiet presence in how men dress—perfect for any guy who wants a jacket that’s as utilitarian as it is fashionable—but has surged in popularity alongside the booming workwear trend. The rise of idiosyncratic trousers and the slow death of the skinny jean have both paved the way for pants that are full of delightful fits, crops, and hems. Combine the two and you can fabricate your own workwear-inspired suit of sorts for a look that feels closer to rugged American style than fine Italian tailoring. During a time when a Carhartt chore coat is deemed just as en vogue as a Brioni blazer, the workwear suit feels just as subversive as it is sharp. It may never be shown on the runway but is instead found on the everyday streets, worn by men from all walks of life. Not to mention that it’s one hell of a way to look dapper without actually dressing up.

Article written by Tyler Watamanuk #GQ

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Rami Malek Makes an Excellent Case for Out-of-Office Work Pants

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Rami Malek Makes an Excellent Case for Out-of-Office Work Pants

Rami Malek on red carpet

Getty Images

Check, please.

Rami Malek has been wearing a lot of really wonderful, brave stuff during the Bohemian Rhapsody press tour. Electric blue and gingham suiting that lands right at the top of our weekly Best-Dressed list, and the kind of colorful sweaters we will never stop trying (and, we suspect, failing) to persuade you to add to your wardrobe. But this move? This one sells itself. If you can look at this photo and honestly tell us you don’t want to look like Rami Malek tonight when you go out to do whatever it is you’re doing, then fine, you’re dismissed. FOR THE OTHER 87 PERCENT OF YOU, let’s talk about what’s happening here.

What’s happening here is Rami Malek wearing work pants and not looking at all like a guy at work. What’s happening here is Rami Malek taking a very conservative item of clothing and making it look like something that could hang in a dive bar or at least a crappy restaurant. What’s happening here is Rami Malek not being the 87 millionth guy to wake up and put on jeans or chinos.

The recipe goes like this: Buy or reach for some nice, respectable trousers that fit well. Slim, no break at the hem, that kind of vibe. Bonus points if they’re check or a deep, dark color. Now wear those trousers with all black. A black bomber jacket, crewneck sweater, and chunky derby shoes if you want to be literal about it. Or try a black Henley, pocket tee, or hoodie as those would probably work, too. Only have black boots? Yeah, try that. Climate too cold for a bomber? A black topcoat or trench coat or even a puffer would fly. The only thing that matters is that you’re taking a truly good pair of work pants and corrupting the hell out of them with Saturday-night clothes, with black.

It’s a good move. But we didn’t have to tell you that.

Uniqlo merino crewneck sweater

$40, Uniqlo

Buy Now

Joseph Edgar tailored trousers

$495, Matches Fashion

Buy Now

Everlane cotton bomber jacket

$88, Everlane

Buy Now

Dr Martens black 1461 derbys

$120, Ssense

Buy Now

Garrett Leight Brooks sunglasses

$395, Garrett Leight

Buy Now

Article written by Megan Gustashaw #GQ

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Ezra Miller is Your New Outerwear King

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Ezra Miller is Your New Outerwear King

Ezra Miller on the red carpet

Getty Images

Bow down.

Ezra Miller has always worn whatever he wants—Mariachi suits, patchwork leather vests, red leather gloves and bell-bottoms—but his personal stylings have taken a turn for the magnificent over the last few weeks (there’s really no other word for it). And if his just-dropped GQ Style cover didn’t clue you in, it is a turn we are most certainly down for. GQ’s own Mobolaji Dawodu pulled everything from Salvatore Ferragamo womenswear to furry coats by Alexander McQueen and Neil Barrett for Miller’s cover shoot—then let the actor do his thing.

And while we’ve finally hit the point where guys on the red carpet know the power of a properly tailored suit (hooray!), seeing a parade of similarly tailored slim suits starts to get a little boring. That’s why we welcome red carpet rebels like Miller who are doing their own damn thing. And Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald press tour has proven to be the ideal stage for the actor and musician’s next-level outfits. Yesterday, Miller wore a dramatic black Pierpaolo Piccioli-designed Moncler Genius puffer coat (puffer gown?) in Paris. Earlier this week he donned the ultimate menswear arts & crafts project: a Bode patchwork suede jacket. And before that, Miller stepped out in a white satin Raf Simons evening coat in Beijing.

Honestly, the actor has given us more statement outerwear inspiration in two weeks than we get in a whole season of watching NBA players exit the tunnel (Westbrook beware). Now, these might not be the sorts of coats we, people not traveling around the world to promote blockbuster movies, can afford to buy or wear on the job, but that’s not the point. Ezra Miller is here to show you how to pull off unapologetic confidence, not a particular trend or item. And, fine, if dressing with more joy and less judgement happens to inspire you to buy a coat in a louder color or with a bigger collar, that’s cool too. In fact, that’s very cool.

Article written by Megan Gustashaw #GQ

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